Contextualising Religion and Society: The Continuities and Changes in the Representation of the Annunciation in Northern Renaissance Art Before and After the Reformation (1517)
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Contextualising Religion and Society: The Continuities and Changes in the Representation of the Annunciation in Northern Renaissance Art Before and After the Reformation (1517)

Figure 1: Workshop of Robert Campin, Annunciation Triptych (Merode Altarpiece), c. 1427-32. Oil on oak, 64.5 x 117.8 cm. The Cloisters Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The narration of the Annunciation that is central to Christianity is based on the Gospel of Luke (1.26-38). These few verses contain the description of the Angel Gabriel … Continue reading

Censoring the Identity for the Sake of Morality: The Rights of the Artist’s vs. the Deceased
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Censoring the Identity for the Sake of Morality: The Rights of the Artist’s vs. the Deceased

Illustration 1: Andres Serrano, The Morgue (Jane Doe, Killed by Police) 1992 The art world is no stranger to controversy. For many years, works have been constantly scrutinized over their artistic validity, medium, presentation, and almost always, their interpretation. But as culture evolves, new boundaries are being broken, leading to an influx of new ethical … Continue reading

Sensitising the Desensitised: The Science-Focused Contemporary Art Charming us into Environmental Altruism
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Sensitising the Desensitised: The Science-Focused Contemporary Art Charming us into Environmental Altruism

The climate change segment of the Rio opening ceremony enacted Drummond de Andrade’s poem- a flower sprouting in the middle of a city street. Image courtesy of National PR (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images) An excerpt of Carlos Drummond de Andrade’s definitive poem, A Flor e a Náusea (Nausea and The Flower), was featured in a commended segment … Continue reading

The Marble Faun: An Egregious Portrayal of Female Expatriate Artists in 19th Century Rome
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The Marble Faun: An Egregious Portrayal of Female Expatriate Artists in 19th Century Rome

    Left to Right: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Marble Faun, and sculptor, Harriet Hosmer Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1860 novel, The Marble Faun, is widely believed to be based on the experiences of the American expatriate sculptors who lived and worked in Rome in the 19th century.[1] In his book, Hawthorne follows a supposedly fictional group of American … Continue reading

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Ash Tower, academic and artist
Interviews / Long Read

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Ash Tower, academic and artist

Ash Tower, plinthing handmade toys by Tiffany Rysdale. Photo credit: Mei Sheong Wong Artist and academic, Ash Tower’s work reveals and explores the hidden social and physical structures of the worlds we inhabit. His creative output runs in parallel with the research, producing a prolific run of artefacts that have been exhibited both in place, and as … Continue reading